Stem Cell Therapy for Eyes Gets Approval

Europe has approved the Western world’s first medicine containing stem cells for people who have suffered injuries caused by burns to the eye. Source: Health24

(BRUSSELS, Belgium) — People who have suffered eye injuries caused by solvents, acids, abrasive and chemical agents will have new treatment available.

Europe has approved the Western world’s first medicine containing stem cells to treat a rare condition caused by burns to the eye, marking a milestone in the use of the technology.

Holoclar, from privately held Italian company Chiesi, was given a marketing green light on Friday by the European Commission for treating so-called limbal stem cell deficiency due to physical or chemical burns. Left untreated, the condition can result in blindness.

The stem-cell therapy is a living-tissue product. It resembles a contact lens and is made from a biopsy taken from a small undamaged area of a patient’s cornea and grown in the laboratory using cell culture.

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By |February 21st, 2015|Uncategorized|0 Comments

New Progress in the Treatment of Osteochondral Defects with Regenerative Medicine

Open Source: ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering

(UNIV. MINHO, Portugal) – In the last few years, great progress has been made to validate tissue engineering strategies in preclinical studies and clinical trials on the regeneration of osteochondral defects.

In the preclinical studies, one of the dominant strategies comprises the development of biomimetic/bioactive scaffolds, which are used alone or incorporated with growth factors and/or stem cells. Many new trends are emerging for modulation of stem cell fate towards osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiations, but bone/cartilage interface regeneration and physical stimulus have been showing great promise.

Besides the matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) procedure, the matrix-associated stem cells implantation (MASI) and layered scaffolds in acellular or cellular strategy are also applied in clinic.

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By |February 20th, 2015|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Can Stem Cells Repair a Radiation-Damaged Brain? In Rats, Yes.

(NEW YORK, NY)—Scientists at Memorial Sloan Kettering and elsewhere are cultivating the art and science of manipulating embryonic stem cells — the immature cells from which all the body’s organs and tissues develop — to form nerve cells, muscle cells, insulin-producing cells, and essentially any cell type of interest.

Investigators have used stem-cell engineering to create nerve cells that might be used to treat Parkinson’s, and have also developed advanced tools for research into melanoma,pancreatic cancer, a rare brain tumor, and other diseases.

Today, in an article published in the journal Cell Stem Cell, an MSK research team reports on another potential use of the technology: as a way to heal radiation-induced brain injury.

The researchers turned stem cells into young central nervous system cells that can mature into oligodendrocytes, which support nerve cells. After exposing rats to brain radiation, they transplanted the engineered oligodendrocytes into the animals’ brains. The cells repaired some of the radiation injury and helped the animals recover a number of brain functions that had been compromised by the treatment.

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By |February 6th, 2015|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Researchers Use Human Pluripotent Stem Cells to Grow Hair

(LA JOLLA, Ca.) — Researchers from Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) have used human pluripotent stem cells to generate new hair in bald mice. The study, published online in PLOS One yesterday, represents the first step toward a cell-based treatment for people with hair loss. In the United States more than 40 million men and 21 million women are affected by hair loss.

The research team developed a protocol that coaxed human pluripotent stem cells to become dermal papilla cells. These are unique cells that regulate hair-follicle formation and growth cycle.

Alexey Terskikh, Ph.D., associate professor in the Development, Aging, and Regeneration Program at Sanford-Burnham, says the next step is to transplant the cells into humans.

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By |January 27th, 2015|Uncategorized|0 Comments