(Evanston, Ill.) — Treatment with a form of stem cell transplantation in individuals with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis has demonstrated improvements in neurological disability, quality of life, and cognitive function. The new study, which appears in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, did not show similar positive results for individuals with secondary progressive MS.

Numerous scientific teams have been exploring the use of stem cell transplantation for multiple sclerosis. A form known as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), which is the form used in this study and various others, involves giving patients an intravenous infusion of their own (autologous) stem cells that have been harvested from peripheral blood or bone marrow in an effort to reset immune system functioning.

The new study was conducted by Richard Burt, MD, of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and his colleagues.

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